Book Reviews, Reviews

The Asylum For Wayward Victorian Girls Review

1_facf023d-e9aa-4c9c-9f4f-2272abcbf5e9_grande

Chances are you’ve never heard of Emilie Autumn unless you move in very particular musical circles; I very much stumbled across her when someone referenced her in a blog. Her style is self-described as ‘victoriandustrial’ with a bit of musical theatre thrown in, which isn’t everyone’s cup of tea but something I actually quite like (if you want to check her out I’d start with Opheliac, which is generally considered to be her best album). She’s bipolar and an outspoken feminist, both of which feed into pretty much everything she does. She’s occasionally a bit controversial in her comments and her aesthetic has garnered accusations of romanticising mental illness, but overall I like her and her music has actually helped me through some tough times.

In 2009 Autumn self-published The Asylum for Wayward Victorian Girls to accompany the tour she was on and is based on the time she spent in a mental institution. Part autobiography, part historical novel, part fantasy, AFWVG is an odd mish-mash of styles mixed in with handwritten notes, recipes and photographs including shots of Autumn herself and as a whole looks stunning.

e58aff730dd430c8e9d5b1b4592dff89

I would definitely describe this as a Marmite book: either it works for you or it doesn’t.

The fictional half of the book is told in letters ‘received’ by Autumn during her time in the mental institution. Emily-with-a-Y, a Victorian violin prodigy who is condemned to life in The Asylum for Wayward Victorian Girls, a place where vulnerable girls are mistreated and abused, and ultimately part of sinister dealings by the corrupt Asylum doctors. It’s fairly standard fare, but for the most part it’s executed reasonably well. Emily-with-a-Y is likeable and very human, although she does fall prey to the ‘Chosen One’ trope a little as the Asylum doctors find her a little too interesting for no apparent reason. There are also a few issues with overly-loquacious style and structure – there are places where the action begins to pick up pace only to be followed by a whole chapter describing the food at the Asylum – but I found it relatively enjoyable and, with a good editor (which will be happening now that Autumn has signed with a publishing house) it definitely has potential.

You do need to let historical accuracy go a little which people have complained about, but I don’t think that that was what Autumn was going for. Although her description can be a little clunky at times she does create a vivid, gritty world that holds genuine fear for the female characters and, although the villains are exaggerated, she draws parallels between their attitudes towards women and sentiments that are still held by some today that manage to cut close to the bone.

But it’s the autobiographical parts of the book that are by far the more interesting. Autumn bares her soul in these sections, drawing on things that she wrote around the time she was committed to create not just an account of her time in the mental institution, but a holistic look at what it means to be ‘crazy’. She’s definitely not always likeable in these parts, but she’s brutally honest about it and it’s both harrowing and beautiful. These parts aren’t for the faint hearted – the three diaries she includes sections of are very difficult to read – but I would honestly say it’s worth it. If you’ve ever been through anything similar then Emilie’s thoughts and experiences will probably speak very personally to you.

Unfortunately, I get the feeling that Autumn became more interested in the fictional world that she created than telling her own story because the autobiographical chapters become less and less frequent and don’t receive any proper conclusion. Instead she meshes the two worlds she’s written about together, which is fair enough, but I would have liked some closure or reflective thoughts on her time in the institution. I would definitely call this my main complaint because I enjoyed (although maybe that’s not the right word) the autobiographical parts much more than the fiction, although I realise that how much Autumn tells us is entirely up to her as it is very personal.

I’m not sure I could say that I recommend this book. It’s definitely not everyone’s cup of tea and I know that a lot of people didn’t like it, either because of the faults in the composition of the fiction or because the autobiography didn’t connect with them, and I can definitely understand why. I have to say that I’m glad I read it though because it spoke to me personally. I think it’s the kind of book each individual would have a different experience with, so if it sounds like your kind of thing then check it out. Just make sure you have a strong stomach.

My Writing, Writing Stuff

Vacuous

I kissed you and you tasted vacuous

You are a void,

a chasm into which I would have willingly thrown myself

just for the thrill of the fall.

I know that you do not love me.

Why should you? Ghost that you are,

solid things of earth hold no interest for you,

and I have too much substance.

My body is flesh and blood and bone and you are air.

I am altogether too human,

too full of hopes and fears and crushing reality to hold your attention for long.

You who float freely above my head,

the tips of your toes brushing my outstretched fingertips.

Perhaps I could grasp your ankle and rise with you

to dance with you amongst the treetops and bed myself down in the clouds next to you.

But I fear that you will drop me

and laugh at my shattered body from above.

If I am to reach your lofty heights it shall be my blood that is spilt in sacrifice

and the offering I make shall be at my own temple

not to your tempestuous god.

I used to think your heart was made of rubies and your words of gold.

But now I know.

There is a black hole where your heart should be.

Good Things, Other Stuff

Some Good Things

The world’s kind of dark right now. It’s not much, but here are some things that are keeping me going. I hope they help.

  1. Old Friends Senior Dog Sanctuary. This is the purest place on earth. With the motto “Where love never grows old”, OFSDS gives senior pups the best last years of their lives. Their Facebook and Instagram pages chronicle the dogs daily routines with delightful captions and the most best comment section on the Internet, with people sharing pictures of their own dogs. OFSDS is good for your heart.
  2. Hello from the Magic Tavern: I’ve got really into podcasts over this past year. They’re great for while walking or having on in the background while working. Hello from the Magic Tavern is my current favourite; completely improvised, it follows everyman Arnie Niecamp as he is unexpectedly thrown into the high-fantasy world of Foon. He sets up his podcasting equipment in the local tavern and interviews wizards, monsters, adventurers and even talking flowers. It’s great fun, especially if you’re familiar with fantasy tropes, and the three main hosts (Arnie, Chunt the shapeshifter and Usidore the Blue Wizard) have great chemistry. You can check out all of the episodes so far here.
  3. WebtoonsI’ve loved webcomics since my brother introduced me to Pokémon X waaaay back in the dark history that was the mid-2000s, and they provide a little light relief from the heavy politics that’s everywhere right now. Webtoons is my favourite site right now. It hosts webcomics across all genres and styles, so there’s something for everyone, and all the comics have regular update schedules. Some personal recommendations of mine include Bluechair, Brutally Honest, As Per Usual, Cluster Fudge and Trash Bird.
  4. ‘Calm the Fuck Down Tea’. I’ve always been a big fan of medicating with tea, and since friend got me this particular brand for Christmas I’ve been drinking it regularly whenever things get a bit much. It’s caffeine free and has rooibos and chamomile amongst other things. You can get it from Firebox.com and thank me later, because it is delicious.

I hope everyone is safe and taking care of themselves. Sorry that this is a bit different to what I usually post (maybe it’ll become a thing, maybe not); we will resume your regular posting shortly. For now, stay safe.

Film Reviews, Reviews

La La Land Review

Beware of spoilers!

la-la-land-poster

I went to see the current darling of Hollywood with my housemates last night. If you haven’t come across La La Land then I don’t know what to say to you, other than to ask you what it’s like under your rock. It’s been everywhere, and has blasted onto the awards scene with 200 nominations including for 14 Oscars – tied for the highest number ever with Titanic and All About Eve – and has rave reviews from both critics and viewers in one of the few cases where the two seem to agree. I went into the cinema quietly hopeful; true, there was no way that it could possibly live up to the hype, but it had several things going for it as far as I was concerned. I love musicals, I’d heard the cinematography was amazing (a passion of mine), and it starred Emma Stone, who holds a special place in my heart ever since Easy A. Should be great, no?

Well, no.

I realise that I’m in the minority in saying this, and I’m in no way trying to tell people what they should and shouldn’t like. If you loved it, great. You clearly saw something I didn’t, and feel free to keep on loving it. I really wish I could join you; I so wanted to love this film and it had so much potential, but there were just several major stumbling blocks that prevent me from joining the parade all the way to the Oscars.

I feel like if La La Land had committed to its concept then it could have been good, but in reality it was just messy. Stylistic choices were made just for aesthetic purposes and cluttered and confused things. The mood switched between quirky and ‘deep’ so quickly it gave me whiplash. It didn’t even feel like it had committed to being a musical: after opening with a huge musical number the film gets bored and wanders into romantic-drama territory before remembering that it’s supposed to be a musical and shoehorning a song in at the end. Admittedly those songs are quite good, although there are only a couple I’d want to hear again, but I feel like if a film’s going to be a musical then it has to be a musical. La La Land seems to want to be a musical because that’s quirky and different, and because musicals are Oscar Bait.

In fact, La La Land seems to do a lot of stuff for quirkiness’ sake. The opening number is a good example of this; it comes across as more a series of stylised ideas than a cohesive sequence, and this just gives the impression that it’s just showing off. Now, there’s nothing necessarily wrong with showing off in film – Tarantino’s movies are nothing if not hugely self-involved and I still love those – but I get the impression that Damien Chazelle confused being ‘different’ with being ‘clever’. The cinematography is ‘clever’, the dialogue is ‘clever’, the message is ‘clever’. It’s like that one hipster friend who dresses well and takes nice photos but is generally insufferable and won’t stop criticising your music taste.

General consistency issues and self-important quirkiness aside, La La Land has potential. There are some nice moments in there, even if they’re sparse and disconnected, and it does manage to evoke the atmosphere of some classic musical films, so props to it for that. But there is one error, one major failing that ruins the whole film (for me at least), that La La Land is guilty of: the characters are fundamentally unlikable.

This really is the sticking point for me when people talk about how much they love the film. I came out of the cinema completely unable to comprehend how people liked, let alone identified with, these people. Mia, played by Emma Stone, has no discernible personality beyond A) wanting to be an actress and B) being Emma Stone, which is normally something I love, but unfortunately silly faces and dancing is not enough to make up for a character who is less than two dimensional. Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) is the embodiment of everything I hate: rude, obnoxious and incredibly pretentious (it’s possible for people to just not like jazz, okay?!), and I can totally understand the ‘white saviour’ criticisms levelled at him for his belief that he can single-handedly save jazz. Their problems are very much middle-class white people problems, and while I’m not saying it’s impossible to feel sorry for struggling actresses and musicians it’s more difficult when they’re living in really nice apartments, going to huge parties and just moaning all the damn time.

The characters are just a series of all of the worst tropes from romantic comedies. They bitch at each other in place of flirting, then have a musical number together and are suddenly madly in love. Instead of actually showing them being a good couple, they have a montage of them doing clichéd romantic things. Worst of all, they’re absolute arseholes to everyone around them because it’s ‘quirky’. Sebastian gets Mia’s attention by blasting his car horn until she comes out of the house (people in the cinema were actually laughing at this, while I was considering what heavy object I would use to bash his head in). Mia’s even worse: she runs out on a dinner with her boyfriend and family because she realises that she’d rather be on a date with another man – a date she made while still dating her boyfriend, no less – abandoning her boyfriend with no explanation and definitely no proper apology.

The more I think about this film the more I dislike it, which is actually quite an achievement. I sat in the cinema waiting, desperately hoping, for it to get better, but it just…didn’t. If you haven’t seen it and you think you might then definitely go, but make up your own mind about the film. Sometimes I do have to wonder if critics have seen something in a film that I haven’t, or, as seems more likely in this case, watched an entirely different film altogether.

Book Reviews, Reviews

The Disaster Artist Review

Apologies for the long hiatus from any content at all, let alone book related content! 

220px-the_disaster_artist

First of all, let me start by saying that if you haven’t seen Tommy Wiseau’s cult masterpiece The Room then you haven’t lived. It is one of the most beautiful messes ever to exist and everyone should see it at least once before they die.

Some context: long ago, in distant 2001, Thomas Wiseau decided to make a film. For those who haven’t seen it, The Room is an attempt at a serious romantic drama written, directed and starred in by Wiseau, who unfortunately has very little talent at any of those three things. The film is only still around because it reached cult status for its sheer awfulness. People attend screenings of The Room like they do Rocky Horror Picture Show, heckling the screen, throwing spoons and joining in with every iconic line (“You’re tearing me apart Lisa!”). It transcends all possible description with mere words, so I can only advise that you seek it out and watch it as soon as possible. You can thank me later. If you can’t watch it right now, all you really need to know can be summed up by this quote from Professor Ross Morin:

It is one of the most important films of the past decade…the Citizen Kane of bad movies.

What The Disaster Artist reveals is that the making of the film was just as painfully entertaining as the film itself. Written by Greg Sestero, Wiseau’s (possibly only) friend who was dragged into starring in the film, this book gives an enthralling insight into every aspect of the film and the genius(?) behind it.

Wiseau is a fascinating and often quite sinister character, both as a man and a filmmaker, and Sestero is perfectly situated to give us a reasonably in-depth look into both. The book alternates between ‘past’ (how Sestero met Wiseau, their friendship and how The Room was conceived) and ‘present’ (describing the making of the film), ending with the glorious premiere. It’s hard to say which chapters I enjoyed more; the filming chapters were great fun and full of hilarious anecdotes about Wiseau’s odd directing choices and his inability to read the lines he wrote himself, and if you’ve seen the film then you’ll find lots of explanation for some of the more…unusual…aspects of the film, such as why there are pictures of spoons everywhere or why there’s a scene where the characters play football in tuxedos for no discernable reason.

But Sestero goes beyond just writing a funny book about a terrible film in the ‘past’ chapters and actually gives some thoughtful insight into Wiseau’s past and how it affects his behaviour and motivations. In some ways this is even more interesting than the amusing anecdotes from the film set, and goes a long way to explain how The Room ended up the way it did. Somehow the film is all the more interesting when you have a glimpse into the psyche of the man who made it. Of course, there’s no way to confirm Sestero’s stories about Wiseau’s past – Wiseau is notorious for lying and avoiding questions about his history – but he makes some educated guesses that turn his friend into more than just a strange comedic caricature.

This is definitely a book I’d recommend to anyone who’s seen The Room, or even anyone with an interest in film-making because it gives such a unique and in-depth perspective of the process. It’s a light and engaging read that offers a little more than most books of its kind. I’ll be interested to see how the film adaptation that’s coming out later this year treats it (yes, they’re making a film about a book about making a film). It’s bound to be entertaining with a great cast, but I’ll like it all the more if it keeps some of the heart that makes this book so readable.

Other Stuff, Personal

Lessons from 2016

Ignoring the complete shitshow that 2016 has been (because what else can you call the year when ‘President Trump’ became not just an idea but reality), it’s been quite a year for me. Yes, I am going to use this post to be self-centered and pretentiously introspective.

It’s been my first year living away from my parents, resulting in a fairly…bumpy ride for my mental health, to put it somewhat lightly, although for the first time it feels like I’m making real progress in getting the treatment I need. I met someone who is so kind and patient I struggle to believe that he’s real sometimes. I’ve made new friends in a new city and had some great times visiting old ones. I’ve made some fairly major mistakes, but I’ve also learned how to pick up the pieces and keep myself going.

I don’t know if I could exactly claim that it’s been a good year, but I can definitely say that I’m proud of myself, and that’s enough for me.

So now that I’ve got all thoughtful and broody on you, I’m going to pretend that I’m in any way qualified to give life advice from the things that I’ve learned over the past year.

  1. Adults really don’t know what they’re doing either. Entering the inner circles of the adult working world is great, because you learn that everyone is making it up as they go along, just like you. You just get better at hiding the fear in your eyes.
  2. Independence is terrifying but ultimately wonderful. Yeah, it’s really weird the first time you have to pay bills or get a P60, but then you realise that you have the ability to buy a huge chocolate cake and eat the entire thing and no-one can stop you, and it’s all uphill from there.
  3. The world sucks a lot of the time, and it’s okay to step away from that every so often.  It’s important to remember that you can’t focus intensely on everything all the time; it’s exhausting and ultimately achieves nothing. You shouldn’t have to feel guilty about taking time for yourself sometimes.  Just appreciate that you are privileged enough to be able to step back from these situations and have some tea.
  4. You’re going to hate your job sometimes. Yes, even if it’s the ‘dream job’, there are going to be days when the last thing you want is to drag yourself to your desk and do whatever it is you’re paid to do. You’re an adult now, you just have to do it anyway. That’s what coffee’s for.
  5. If you want something, you’ve got to ask for it. People aren’t mind readers (fortunately). If you want something, it’s no good sitting quietly and just hoping it’ll happen without your input. I really struggle with this; my anxiety and my general upbringing have taught me to try and get in the way as little as possible, so asking for things is a big no. This is definitely something I’m still going to be working on in 2017.
  6. Tinder does work sometimes. Speaking from experience here. I know it can be disheartening, wading through the weirdos, cultists and dick picks, but one day you might just find a guy who asks you out using movie quotes and then takes you on a personalised tour of the city because you mentioned you were new here and shares his umbrella with you when it starts to rain. Just keep swiping and you might find him. Maybe. No guarantees though.
  7. Your significant other is human, just like you. Your partner is going to mess up sometimes, and you can’t resent them for that because you’re going to mess up just as much, if not more. Everyone has their bad days, but it’s wanting to be with someone even during those times that makes a relationship work.
  8. Tea is actually magic. I drank a lot of tea through my teens (I’m from Yorkshire, it comes with the territory), but I never truly appreciated the medicinal properties of a steaming mug of English Breakfast after the most stressful day at work, or a cup of chamomile while you read in bed.
  9.  It’s okay to not be okay. It’s taken me a long time to figure this one out. Still working on it.
  10. People are good. I’ve always taken the attitude that people as a group are awful, but most individuals have at least the potential for goodness. This year has kind of proved that for me. As scary as things may seem right now, surrounding yourself with compassionate, generous people makes life seem just a little brighter.

It’s not much, but it’s kept me going this year. I hope that 2017 is a wonderful year for everyone, and that things won’t seem quite so hopeless after a cup of tea.

NaNoWriMo, Writing Stuff

Camp NaNoWriMo, or Why Do I Do This To Myself?

It seems that I just can’t help myself.

I’d actually forgotten that Camp NaNoWriMo was a thing. I tried it once before during July Camp and got a couple of days in before I realised that there were other things I could be doing with my Summer holidays, like sleeping for inordinate amounts of time, binge watching Supernatural (I was super into Supernatural back then) and then sleeping some more.

For those not in the know, Camp NaNoWriMo is an offshoot of National Novel Writing Month, which is a thing where tens of thousands of people around the world go insane and try to write 50,000 words in a month (I wrote a survival guide for it last November). The primary difference between Normal NaNo and Camp NaNo is that at Camp you get to set your own word goal. Of course, if you were really sensible you would set it to 0, or maybe 10 if you were feeling really ambitious. I, being a silly person, have decided to attempt 25,000 in what I have affectionately termed a ‘Half NaNo’. The thinking behind this is that if I can achieve a Half NaNo with my new work schedule, I can at least think about attempting a Full NaNo in July. Also Half NaNo and Full NaNo sound like sailing knots, and for some reason that’s funny to me.

Just to make things more difficult for myself, I’m going to try and take you along on this magical NaNo journey with me. Maybe I can inspire some of you who have never undertaken NaNoWriMo before to give it a go come July or November. Maybe I’ll just put everyone off for life. Either way, check back for updates on my word count, the amount of coffee I’ve drunk and how many characters I’ve killed off this time! It should be a fun time for all involved. Except maybe those dead characters.

 

Other Stuff

March Wrap Up and April TBR

I’ve finally managed to get out of my reading slump! It feels so good to be able to say that.

Despite this month being pretty busy with travelling around for Easter and my birthday (someone reminded me that this was my last year of being a ‘teen’, and now I’m having a small crisis), I’ve read more this month than I have in a while. I managed to read everything on my TBR and then an extra, and I’ve started both Outlander and The Talented Mr. Ripley as well.

April’s TBR shouldn’t have any shortage of possible material, because I’ve bought so many books (darn you Amazon and your book sale!). Now it’s just a matter of deciding which to read first.

51iyfcd4jtl-_sx324_bo1204203200_

 

As mentioned, I’ve started this one today. I did read it a few years ago and remember really enjoying it. I watched the film the other day (hello young Jude Law) and got a sudden urge to reread it. It’s actually better than I remember, so if you haven’t read it and enjoy thrillers I would highly recommend it.

 

71I’m reading this one on the recommendation of a work friend, who I actually bonded with over Marvel films and men with beards. I was assured that this contained men with not only beards but also kilts, so I was sold.

More seriously though, I’ve been informed that this is a great piece of historical fiction and that it’s incredibly well written. I’ve read the first couple of chapters already and I’m loving the style, and the protagonist’s husband is absolutely adorable, so I’m looking forward to more.

Also, men in kilts.

a12b3haiof6l

 

I can’t believe I’m so far behind the bandwagon on this one. When I first heard about it I wasn’t enamoured with the idea and dismissed it as just a space book, but the more I’ve heard about the humour and the emotion the more I’ve been worn away, and seeing clips from the film that I really enjoyed finally broke me to the point where I’m actually really looking forward to this now.

 

 

large_large_8cpr5psqeny12frn6fh6y9cskpy

 

 

adore Alan Bennett. He’s the ultimate sarcastic Yorkshireman, The History Boys is one of my favourite plays ever (which reminds me, I need to watch the film again…) and his prose is just as good as his plays. The recent film brought The Lady in the Van to my attention and I honestly can’t wait to read it.

 

harry20potter20and20the20philosophers20stone20202

 

 

Having finally rectified the tragic state of affairs where I didn’t own my own copies of the Harry Potter books, it’s far past time for my at-least-yearly reread of the series. If anyone would want to do a read along with me just let me know and I’ll see what I can organise!

 

 

city_of_bones

 

I’ve read the first two books in the Mortal Instruments series before several years ago. I remember liking the ideas but being a little disappointed in the execution, and one particular development made my put the series down. I’ve been watching the new Netflix series though and have really been enjoying it, so I decided it was time to give the books another go. If anyone has any hints about what order I’m supposed to read them in it would be much appreciated, because I’m clueless. Mortal Instruments first? Infernal Devices? Some combination of the two? Help!

 

If anyone has any recommendations for next month’s TBR I’d be more than happy to hear them (although my bank account might not). Has anyone read any of these before? And can anyone please help me with these Mortal Instrument books?!

Other Stuff, Tags

YA Frenzy Tag

I was tagged in this by the lovely Jemima at The Bookaholic to do Icebreaker 694‘s YA Frenzy tag!

  • Respond to this new tag in comments (so I know if you can participate).
  • Read through my Q&A.
  • Answer the questions I posted for my Q&A in your own post.
  • Choose at least 3 to 5 other bloggers to participate!

1. What book got you started on the path of YA?

I adored the Skulduggery Pleasant series by Derek Landy (I still do), and, while the first three are more ‘older children’s fiction’ they mature throughout, and I would definitely say that they gave me my first taste of YA.

My first proper YA book though was probably John Green’s Looking for Alaska, which I threw across the room twice. Surprisingly, that meant that I loved it.

2. List 3 awesome book related gifs, add your own captions.

Trying to get your friends to read your favourite book/series:

tumblr_inline_o4aivrypco1rug82z_500

Trying to stay calm when everything is going to hell in the final chapters:

tumblr_m75a7wf6xf1rts02xo1_500

This just sums up reading in general really:

tumblr_mlenb8dsqd1qhqs8so1_250

3. What was the latest series you finished?

I haven’t read a YA series in a long time, unless you count Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl and Carry On as one series, which I sort of do. I’m about to start reading the Mortal Instruments though, as soon as I’ve worked out what order I’m supposed to read them in (original or prequels first? And where do these prequel-sequels fit?!)

4. What is one thing that you hate in YA? What is one thing you love?

I hate love triangles. Hate them. I always want to shake the protagonist, because they always have better things to do than mope around, like, I don’t know, saving the world! For me it detracts from the plot, and half the time the final choice is obvious anyway. Also, one of the love interests is always a ‘bad boy’ (or other gendered equivalents), which is basically shorthand for ‘genuinely terrible person’.

What I love about YA is that it’s the only genre I’ve found that really takes modern topics seriously, particularly those affecting young adults. Themes like LGBTQA issues, mental illness and the pressures of growing up do all appear in other genres, but are often badly handled (I’m looking at you Ian McEwan) The vast majority of YA fiction treats these topics with great sensitivity and insight, which is wonderful because I think that teenagers and young adults really need to see their lives properly represented. And then placed against a backdrop of magic and world-saving, because everything’s better with magic.

5. Take this Buzzfeed quiz and post your results. The quiz is “Are You Able to Identify the Real YA Cover From the Fake?”

You got 10 out of 10 right!
You did better than 100% of those who took this quiz!
Golden Bookworm
You’re a gold-standard bookworm! You can definitely identify your YA covers like a BOSS. Never stop getting your read on.
It took me forever to even work out what the difference between the Divergent covers was…
Comics, Other Stuff

Envelope Comics

I realise that I promised new content in my last post, and have since been hit by an incredibly busy time at work, as well as having to travel around a lot. So in lieu of an actual book-related post (which is coming soon, I swear), have some crappy comics I drew at work when I was bored because I’ve been reading too much xkcd and Hark, a Vagrant and thought that I could do the same with a biro on the back on an envelope (spoiler: I can’t). I might redraw some of these on better paper with a working biro and a non-sleep deprived brain in the future, if anyone out there likes them for some strange reason. Or at the very least I’ll find a way to scan them in rather than using my terrible phone camera.

So enjoy my attempts to be funny!

 

image
This one actually started out serious and cute, I swear.

 

 

image
A Portal and a Magritte reference in one? Never let it be said that this blog isn’t cultured.

 

 

image
For some reason this was the funniest thing in the world when I first drew it.

 

 

image
A History A-Level based entirely on his reign and this is still the main thing I know about Henry VIII.

 

 

image
Oh, and this.